If you live in China, you’ve no doubt already come across the joys and perils of English-Chinese voice translators. It seems every Chinese person and their pet Pekingnese has one these days, but most work poorly at best. While Google Translate serves the majority of expat needs, especially now it’s available without a VPN, its voice translator is still pretty embarrassing. Here are four voice translation apps that aren’t so much.

 

Microsoft Translator

After long playing second fiddle to Google Translate, Microsoft Translator has now come into its own thanks to its superior voice translator services. Its real-time conversation mode makes it easier to have more natural-sounding convos with people in Chinese (and other languages), and it’s accuracy and efficiency are second to none. You can even have a conversation with several people using different languages, all at the same time. The app also offers the usual text and text-to-voice translations as well as a phrasebook and pronunciation guide. Handy for if you’re traveling, you can also download languages to translate offline later.

Price: FREE in the App Store, Windows Store, Amazon Apps and Google Play.

iTranslate Voice

iTranslate offers great voice-to-voice real-time translations between Chinese and English for both i0s and Android devices. Not all of the 44 languages and dialects it offers have full capabilities, but luckily for us, Mandarin does. This also gives you text-to-speech translations, a personalized phrasebook and iPhone-iPhone translations. The latter means that if you’re talking to someone on another iPhone, you’ll hear what they say in Chinese and they’ll hear what you say in English. Pretty magic!

Price: USD6.99 (around RMB 480) in Google Play and App store.

SayHi

SayHi (and the one below it) is only available for iPhones, so stop reading now if you use any other device. The app boasts a refreshingly simple interface and claims 95% accuracy for voice recognition. You can also set the speed and pick between male and female voices for your desired translation. If you’re a gruff British guy but fancy being a slow-talking sultry Chinese woman, therefore, that dream can totally come true. This app isn’t ideal for traveling abroad, however, because an internet connection is required.

Price: FREE in the App Store.

Speak & Translate

As the name suggests, Speak & Translate is specifically focused on speech-to-speech translations. What’s great about this little baby is that its fully iCloud integrated, so you can save all your translation history on Apple devices and also switch devices mid-conversation, if you felt the need to. It’s only available on Apple devices though, naturally, and needs a data connection to work.

Price: Free from the App Store

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Keywords: English Chinese voice translators best voice translators

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comment|74344|1652961

Baidu Translate app

Sep 08, 2017 19:52 Report Abuse